Breathing exercises, relaxation, and how to organise were amongst the dominating search trends on Google this week, no surprise as lockdown probably has people feeling stressed. The list of top search queries also highlights that people were searching on Google for relaxing chill house music, meditation, and how to calm down. Self care in the time of coronavirus is likely to be a lasting need. Google’s latest search trends also shows that “how to declutter” was a top searched question not just this week but in the past 30 days. The new search trends clearly show that people are finding ways on Google to cope during the outbreak of COVID-19.

Google has released its search trends for this week to detail what people search the most in the last seven days. So here’s a deep dive into the dominating search queries of this week.

1. Relaxation
As per the latest trends released by Google, global searches for the word “relaxation” are at record high and rising. People are actively searching for relaxing music to support them in this tough time. You’ll find a large number of videos offering deep sleep, healing, and calm music on YouTube. There are also specific music videos to help you focus on your studies or work while staying at home. Further, people have searched for questions such as “how to relax the mind from stress” and terms such as “deep relaxation” and “rubbing muscles as a form of relaxation”.

2. Meditation
Google has also been used in the past few days to search for online meditations. The search giant has revealed that the term “meditation” is being searched more than ever before. It has also reached new levels in places such as Ireland where several people have searched for meditation. Search queries including “Chris Hemsworth meditation” and “live meditation with Sri Sri” are also getting bigger on the search engine. Meditation has proven results of improving focus and providing relaxation. It is also a common practice in many religions. Some workout apps also have features to enable meditation.

3. Breathing exercises
An enormous number of people on Google have also searched for breathing exercises this week. The queries for breathing exercises soar as countries across the globe are under the lockdown for some time and people are finding ways to reduce their stress and improve health while staying indoors. Google provides a one-minute breathing exercise module when a user searches for breathing exercises on the search engine. You can also look for some external results to help find a breathing technique to relax and reduce your stress levels.

4. How to organise
How to organise is another top search query on Google for this week. This suggests that people want some tricks and ways to learn tidiness while staying in the lockdown. Ethiopia, the US, and Canada are amongst the top regions for the how to organise searches. However, several people from India have also asked the same question to Google to stay organise. Netizens have also asked Google to show results for how to organise apps, clothes, bedroom, and desk.

5. Inner peace
Just like how people have searched for relaxation and meditation, Google has also seen a growing trend in searches for the term “inner peace”. In fact, the search trends for “how to calm down” are at an all-time high, and people are also searching for “coping during COVID” to understand how they stay healthy in the pandemic. Sources including the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, the US’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and World Health Organization (WHO) have listed ways to help people cope with the stress during the COVID-19 outbreak. There are also various other bodies including Harvard University and the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) that are providing ways to reduce the mental impact of the pandemic.


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